Tuesday, 11 December 2018
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BREAKING NEWS

Our Rescue Me series features pet rescue and foster stories from our readers. Once a month, we bring you a story about an animal fostered or adopted from a shelter or rescue group or taken in as a stray.

 Do you have a compelling story about dogs and cats (or other animals — we love them all) that you’ve fostered, rescued from a shelter or taken in as a stray? We’d love to hear it. Fill out the form here. Questions? Email digital editor Beth Hutson at bhutson@fayobserver.com. Be sure to join our Facebook group, FO Pet Welfare & Rescue, at facebook.com/groups/FOPetRescueWelfare.

November’s story comes to us from Aneita Emerson, who adopted an older dog about two years ago.

I grew up with animals in the house and as an adult, had a dog of my own until 2008. I went to college to complete a degree and went to grad school immediately after.

About two years after graduating, I contemplated getting a dog. I anguished over the decision because of how much I work, knowing any dog I got would be alone a lot. My daughter and her family began rescuing small dogs and we discussed me getting one but I wanted a bigger dog.

My daughter called one day because a fellow rescuer had a friend who was looking to give away their dog because their baby was now a toddler and the two did not get along. This had to be a match from heaven because Huckleberry, Huck for short, is a lab mix (larger dog) and was already house and kennel trained. It broke my heart that someone felt they had to give him away. I think he had a good life before coming to live with me. He has a great temperament and personality. He has the most expressive face and eyes and he loves people. I saw pictures of him on a paddleboard with his previous owner, so I think he was pretty active.

He is a lab mix about 13-15 years old. He loves to be home and has some separation anxiety around leaving his house for a long period of time, not eating for one to two days if we go somewhere.

No biscuits for Huck

He loves treats and tries to con you out of food. I have to be 99 percent strict with his food because he has a sensitive stomach sometimes.

I found out the hard way that Huck has a sensitive stomach. I mostly let Huck eat his food but share a potato chip now and then. A friend was staying with me and went to the corner store to get breakfast biscuits. My friend brought Huck a biscuit just for him, a bologna biscuit. Of course Huck ate it all, quickly. Maybe a little too quickly. Needless to say, my dog was throwing up the rest of the day. I had to stay outside with him and ended up giving him Pepto-Bismol before he finally quit throwing up. He definitely does not get a biscuit any more.

Huck has the most precious personality. His eyes are so kind, and he loves people but prefers adults. Huck is happy just sitting in your lap, even though he is not a lap dog. He loves being petted and hugged and even talks to you. Huck loves to chase his tennis ball when he is outside.

‘Dogs are lifesavers’

My parents lived on a dead-end dirt road and were forever finding dogs that people would drop off, not wanting them anymore. The love animals have to give is amazing. To me, dogs are lifesavers for anyone that will take time with them. Their love is endless and unconditional.

Huck helped me learn to live life again and gave me that unconditional love. He knows when I’m happy and will share that happiness. He knows when I’m sad and will sit in the chair with me, letting me love and hug him. He knows when I’m disappointed in him and is just pitiful.

Aneita Emerson, 56, lives in Red Springs, and works in community mental health.

Source: https://www.fayobserver.com/news/20181103/rescue-me-age-is-nothing-but-number

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