The presenter is looking forward to the new challenge (Picture: Dave Hogan/Getty Images)

Bill Turnbull’s radio show, titled Pet Sounds, will play ‘the most soothing classical music’ to keep canine companions happy and chilled during fireworks displays on Saturday.

It’s hard to deny pyrotechnics are pretty, but there are some downsides to this time of year – one of them being that many of us spend Bonfire Night trying and failing to calm down our poor pets.

However, the former BBC Breakfast presenter thinks he’s found a solution.

Bill will host the two hour show from 7pm on Classic FM, when fireworks will be set off across the country in celebration of Bonfire Night, and it sounds absolutely adorable.

Revealing that he’s looking forward to the new and pretty unusual challenge, he said: ‘The music we play on Classic FM is always relaxing, but what we’ve got lined up is even more chilled than usual and a lot of it will be pet-related.

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‘There is a piece that Elgar named after his cairn terrier called Mina, and John Barry has got a lovely lyrical composition called Crazy Dogs.’

He added: ‘I’ve been very happily presenting to humans for the past two-and-a-half years on Classic FM, so hosting this show will be a pleasure and possibly a step up.’

The radio station worked with Battersea Dogs and Cats Home to make sure they could produce the most calming vibes possible for our four-legged friends. The show will also feature listener dedications to pets.

Pet Sounds is the latest in a series of music projects developed for pets.

Recently, the internet has seen the rise of RelaxMyDog, a YouTube channel which aims to ‘help any dog breed with a variety of problems including separation anxiety, sleep problems, loneliness, boredom and depression.’

The channel currently boasts more than 80 million views.

Guess we know what we’re doing this Bonfire Night.

MORE: Presenter Bill Turnbull nearly quit cancer treatment: ‘I couldn’t bear it any longer’

MORE: Bill Turnbull completes chemotherapy for prostate cancer: ‘We’ve got an awfully long way to go’

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