Friday, 14 December 2018
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Ask Dr Bruce Chard: How can I stop my cat’s eye problem from recurring?

Cats with any eye problem must be checked by a vet first to have a plan to manage any ongoing problem.

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Cats with any eye problem must be checked by a vet first to have a plan to manage any ongoing problem.

Nemo, my 15-month-old burmese cat, sometimes gets a cream discharge from one of his eyes. I bathe it with clean water and it settles down but how do I stop it from coming back?

Nemo may be suffering from conjunctivitis which is inflammation of the eye. It is important to have any eye problem checked by your vet first to have a plan to manage any ongoing problem. Simple bacterial conjunctivitis will clear quickly when an antibiotic cream is used for up to five days. Any scratch to the surface of the eye results in much pain and squinting of the eye with a watery discharge which requires immediate treatment from your vet. Sometimes repeated irritation in an eye may be due to extra eyelid hairs against the eye or an eyelid deformity. If Nemo suffered from a respiratory infection when he was younger this may have caused damage to the duct draining tears from his eye leading to constant wetness about his eye.

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A friend recently had her cocker spaniel treated by her vet after she ate a lot of chocolate. She is fine now but I am worried if my boxer Gus ever got into chocolate. Does it make a difference what type of chocolate is eaten?

Chocolate is poisonous to dogs because it contains theobromine which in high doses can lead to heart failure and seizures. The highest amount of theobromine is in cocoa powder followed by baking chocolate then dark chocolate and lowest in milk chocolate. White chocolate has very little so should not cause a problem for dogs. If your dog does eat chocolate it is best to visit your vet as soon as possible with any packaging of the chocolate. If caught in time dogs are given a drug to make them vomit and placed on intravenous fluids for support. Charcoal may also be given by mouth to block further absorption. Most cases are successfully treated and it would be rare for a dog to have major complications. 

Dr Bruce Chard owns North Harbour Veterinary Clinic in Auckland. He has been a vet for more than 40 years and has a pekingese dog and two burmese cats. Visit nhv.co.nz or email contact@northharbourvet.co.nz

 

Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/cutestuff/107946595/ask-dr-bruce-chard-how-can-i-stop-my-cats-eye-problem-from-recurring

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